Real Estate Superstitions

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Today, just for fun, we’re taking a look at some popular real estate superstitions and other beliefs from around the globe that can affect the outcome of a home sale. Whether you’re a real estate agent, a buyer or a seller, we’re sure you’ll find a little something of interest here.

1. St. Joseph

Perhaps the best known real estate superstition is the one about St. Joseph. St. Joseph is the patron saint of home and family. Rumor has it that if you bury him in the yard of a home you’re hoping to sell, he will speed up the transaction. There are even hundreds of testimonials from adent believers that back this claim up. In fact, you can buy a “St. Joseph Home Sale Kit.” With a price tag of only $9.47, it can’t hurt to give it a try! Just be sure the saint’s head is pointing toward the street and that you don’t dig him up until the deal is closed.

2. 13 is an unlucky number

This is a common superstition that carries over to real estate in multiple ways. Although many agents feel like Friday is a good day to list a house, if it’s Friday the 13th many sellers would rather hold off. The same goes for home closings – one agent we talked to even had a buyer reschedule the closing (and the moving truck) so she wouldn’t be signing papers on Friday the 13th.

Along the same lines, many multi-story buildings don’t have a 13th floor because it’s considered unlucky. Builders will either stop at the 12th floor or skip straight to the 14th. If you’re looking for a 13th floor condo in New York, you better plan on looking for a long, long time.

3. Numerology real estate superstitions

There are lucky numbers, too, of course. In Chinese culture, the number 8 is considered to be auspicious because it sounds like the Chinese word for wealth. So if an address has an 8 in it, it can help sell a property to Chinese buyers. The number 4 is thought to be unlucky though, because it sounds like the Chinese word for death.

Numerology is more of a belief than a superstition and can definitely have an impact on the sale of real estate. If you work with clients who have numerology as part of their belief system, it can be worth learning the basics so you don’t waste time or make them unhappy by taking them to see “unlucky” houses.

4. Feng Shui

Feng Shui is a a system of beliefs considered to govern spatial arrangement and orientation in relation to the flow of energy. People who practice Feng Shui will want to assess a property based on key tenets. For example, a house at a t-shaped intersection is considered bad Feng Shui because the chi coming from the road is rushing too strongly towards the house and, in most cases, negatively affects the energy of the house. Learn more here.

These are just a few of the most common real estate supersitions, but there are many more out there – like this story of buyers who brought a priest to assess a house they were considering. The priest found a bad spirit in a tree out front, making the property out of the question for the buyers.

What real estate superstitions have you encountered?

5 Comments

  • It is funny, that there is no end to the superstitions. It doesn’t matter if it is common or not, but you still need to respect it.

    • Geneva Ives says:

      We agree. It definitely helps you work with a variety of buyers if you take the time to learn a little more about their beliefs and the history behind them.

  • RON COULTER says:

    I sold a house with a “666” address. Several ad call respondents wouldn’t even look at it when I told them the house number.

    It eventually sold to someone who laughed it off-but had the post office change the number before he resold it!

    • Chris de Jong says:

      Wow! That’s quite the story Ron. We totally forgot about number associations like that. Smart of the home owner to change the number before re-selling 🙂

  • Where to Find the Most Superstitious US Home Buyers - Point2Homes News says:

    […] 13 is not the only superstition among American home buyers or sellers. Check out more real estate superstitions found by our friends at […]

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